Agenda and draft minutes

Cabinet Advisory Panel B - Monday 23 May 2022 7.00 pm

Venue: Council Chamber - Civic Centre. View directions

Contact: Email: memberservices@dartford.gov.uk 

Items
No. Item

1.

Apologies for Absence

Minutes:

Apologies for absence were submitted on behalf of Councillors Barham, Burrell, S Gosine, Perfitt and Swinerd.

 

Apologies for lateness were submitted on behalf of Councillors Hammock and Harman, who joined the meeting during consideration of item 7.

 

The Chairman welcomed new Members to the Advisory Panel following their appointment at the recent Annual Council meeting and expressed his thanks to former Members who were no longer serving on the Panel. In particular he welcomed Councillor Gaskin who had been unable to attend meetings for some time due to illness.

2.

Items drawn down for Debate

Minutes:

The Chairman advised that the following items from parts B, C and D of the agenda had been drawn down for debate:

 

13

Proposal for the making of the Dartford Borough Council Public Spaces Protection Order 2022 – Nuisance Vehicles – Borough of Dartford following Public Consultation

14

Air Quality Action Plan – Consultation Draft

 

Accordingly, Members endorsed the Officer recommendations in respect of the following items from those parts of the agenda:

 

12

Land East of Lowfield Street Development – Redevelopment by Bellway (Thames Gateway) Phases 2 & 3 – Boundary Matters

15

Minutes of the Policy Overview Committee held on 15 March 2022

 

3.

Declarations of Interest

To receive declarations of interest from Members including the terms(s) of the Grant of Dispensation (if any) by the Audit Board or the Chief Officer & Director of Corporate Services.

Minutes:

There were no declarations of interests.

4.

Confirmation of the Minutes of the Meeting of the Cabinet held on 21 April 2022 pdf icon PDF 96 KB

Summary:

 

To consider the minutes of the meeting of the Cabinet held on 21 April 2022.

 

Recommendation:

 

That the minutes of the meeting of the Cabinet held on 21 April 2022 be confirmed as an accurate record.

Minutes:

The Advisory Panel received the minutes of the meeting of the Cabinet held on 21 April 2022.

5.

Urgent Items

The Chairman will announce his decision as to whether there are any urgent items and their position on the agenda.

Minutes:

There were no urgent items.

6.

References from Committees

None at this stage.

Minutes:

There were no references from other committees.

7.

Fleetdown United Football Club - Consultation on Open Space Disposal - Notice of Intention to Lease Land held for the Purposes of Public Open Space pdf icon PDF 136 KB

Summary:

 

To consider representations following a public consultation related to proposals for land at Heath Lane made by Trustees of the Fleetdown United Football Club and to determine accordingly.

 

Recommendations:

 

1. That Cabinet considers the representations made in relation to the Council’s notice of intention to dispose (through the grant of a further lease) of approximately 3.1 hectares of land at Heath Lane to Fleetdown United Football Club, and that Cabinet either:

(a)   confirms (through the grant of a further lease) the disposal of land at Heath Lane edged red and partly cross-hatched, on the plan at Appendix B to the report; or

(b)   not grant a further lease in relation to land at Heath Lane described in recommendation 1(a);

 

2. That Cabinet considers the representations, including the submission of a petition (as detailed in Appendix A to the report), made to the Council in relation to proposals by the Trustees of Fleetdown United Football Club to request landlord consent for the erection of a fence and that Cabinet either:

(c)  grants landlord consent for the erection of a fence to prevent access to the site on non-match days (subject to appropriate planning consent(s)); or

(d)  not grant landlord consent for the erection of the fence; and

 

3. That, should Cabinet be minded to approve the grant of a further lease of the Heath Lane open space land and/or the erection of a fence, authority be granted to the Director of Growth and Community, in consultation with the Head of Legal Services, to approve the heads of terms of the lease to the Trustees of the Fleetdown United Football Club.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Council’s Valuer introduced a report which detailed the background to proposals for land at Heath Lane by the Trustees of Fleetdown United Football Club. The Trustees of the Fleetdown United Football Club had been awarded external funding from FA/Sport England for the upgrading of the Club’s facilities and for maintaining/improving the football pitches. However the grant of funds was conditional on the Club having an unexpired lease term of at least 25 years. The current lease was due to expire in 2037 (15 years). The Club was also seeking to enclose the main pitches and to protect its facilities by erecting a fence between the field access gate (from Heath Lane) and the fences of properties in Roseberry Gardens backing onto the pitches as shown on the plan attached at Appendix A to the report. In accordance with statutory requirements to give public notice of the intention to dispose of open space land the Council issued public notice in a local newspaper and on the Council’s web site and issued further public notices in April as a result of significant public interest in the proposed land disposal.

 

A total of 414 responses were received to the consultations, of which 323 opposed the proposal, 91 were in favour and 10 agreed with the lease but not the fence. The Council had also received a petition containing 20 signatures opposing the disposal of the land as outlined in Appendix A to the report. The main objections related to concern around the loss of public open space, lack of future access for dog walkers or availability for recreational use and concern about possible intensification of use by the football club. However the principal complaint was the Club’s proposal to fence off the larger part of the playing field which it believed to be necessary to protect the playing surface and to improve security following the proposed substantial investment in the facilities, for which planning permission would need to be obtained by the Club. The Cabinet was being invited to determine whether it wished to accede to the Club’s proposals for the land by granting a further lease, or not, and if it decided to grant the lease whether it should grant landlord consent for the erection of a fence (subject to the Club obtaining the necessary planning consents). It was stressed that whilst informal discussions with the Club were ongoing, no formal plans had been drawn up by the Club in respect of improvement proposals for the facilities, that there had been no discussions with the Club over the terms of any potential lease and that no landlord consent had been given for the erection of a fence.

 

A Member asked whether the Club had any CCTV on the site to protect its facilities and was advised that it was believed that the Club had limited CCTV but that this only covered the Clubhouse and that there was no coverage of the sports pitches, which the Club was keen to protect.

 

The  ...  view the full minutes text for item 7.

8.

Westgate and Former Co-Op Site Development pdf icon PDF 161 KB

Summary:

 

The Collaboration Agreement, to provide for the town centre development of the former Co-Op site, between the Council and Homes England ended on 15 April 2022. It is a condition precedent of the Agreement that, to enable the implementation of the development, viability shall be satisfied. Despite the endeavours of the parties this has not been possible and the final viability position is a deficit that would require a level of Council funding that cannot be supported.

Upon expiry of the Collaboration Agreement it is proposed that the Council will seek to acquire the former Co-op site from Homes England, subject to Contract, Valuation and negotiation to support best consideration. The Council would then take a Freehold interest which, along with the existing adjacent landholding, will allow it overall control to lead a regeneration plan to develop the site as a housing-led scheme of a quality and density which is appropriate to this key town centre site.

 

Recommendations:

 

1. That the Council agrees to the mutual termination of the Development Agreement with Muse;

2. That the Council approves a payment to Muse (to a maximum value as indicated in exempt Appendix A to the report) in respect of work undertaken by Muse under the Development Agreement from which it will no longer benefit.  The rights to appropriate surveys, designs, schedules, environmental assessments and studies will revert to the Council and inform future proposals; 

 

3. That the Council approves the acquisition of the Freehold Property interest in the former Co-op site development from Homes England (to a maximum value as indicated in exempt Appendix B) to enable the Council to secure and safeguard the asset for future regeneration of the town centre;

4.  That Cabinet recommends to the General Assembly of Council an increase in the capital programme budget to support the acquisition at recommendation 3; and

5. That the progression of the design and development of the project with associated costs be approved to a maximum value of £250,000 Ex VAT

Minutes:

The Director of Growth and Community introduced a report which provided an update on matters relating to the Westgate and former Co-Op site in Dartford Town Centre. The report detailed the earlier proposals to develop this key site and the significant changes to the commercial property market since the inception of the proposals which had impacted on the viability of the development. The Council had worked hard with its development partner, Muse Developments Limited, but in spite of best endeavours, this work revealed that even the most appropriate proposal on commercial terms would require considerable Council investment and involve a scale and density of development incompatible with the Council’s determination for any scheme to reflect the town’s traditional market-town character. The Council was determined to safeguard this important regeneration site from inappropriate development by acquiring full title and to terminate the development agreement predicated on commercial returns. This would enable the Council to bring forward more appropriate, lower impact proposals which could be delivered in the current market and make a lasting contribution to the regeneration of the town centre community.  The collaboration agreement between the Council and Homes England ended on 15 April 2022 and it was now proposed that the Council should seek to acquire the freehold interest in the site from Homes England which, along with the existing adjacent landholding, would allow the Council to have better control to produce a regeneration plan to develop the site as a housing –led scheme of a quality and density appropriate to the town centre site.

 

A Member asked about the original financial agreement with Muse which included a payment by the Council to the developer of £1.4M to cover initial preparatory costs and asked whether this payment was made and whether the Council would receive anything in return. She reminded Members that her Group had originally challenged the level of this contribution when it was originally proposed and that this was a significant amount of money. The Director of Growth & Community explained that the Council was obliged to make the payment as the Council had been in collaboration with the developer and that this money had been a contribution towards development planning preparations. The money spent on these initial costs was actually in excess of £2M but the Council’s contribution had been capped at £1.4M. The Council would not get this money back but had ownership of the various plans and surveys that had been conducted, and would have needed to be undertaken prior to any development of the site, so would benefit enormously from the work already carried out which would inform future development proposals. The Council had also commissioned scrutiny of these costs by a specialist third party who had confirmed the costs and as a result the Council had a body of work of greater value than the cost incurred directly by the Council. The Member said that the Council was now proposing to spend a significant amount of money to buy Home England’s part  ...  view the full minutes text for item 8.

9.

Community Infrastructure Levy - Unparished Areas of the Borough pdf icon PDF 168 KB

Summary:

 

This report sets out proposals for the use of CIL funding available to support the delivery of non-strategic infrastructure within the unparished areas of the Borough required to support growth arising from new development.

 

Recommendations:

 

1. That the governance principles for the management and decision making of CIL funding retained by the Council for the unparished areas of the Borough, as set out in paragraphs 5.1 to 5.2 and Appendix B of the report, be agreed;

 

2. That the Head of Planning Services be authorised to develop an initial delivery programme of projects for the unparished areas of the Borough, as set out in paragraphs 5.5 to 5.7 of the report, and that a further report to Cabinet in late summer/early autumn of 2022 be submitted for approval, to consult the local community on this programme;

 

3. That further work be undertaken regarding the issue of community capacity, as set out in paragraphs 5.3 to 5.4 of the report, with a further report to Cabinet in 2023, on the results of this work and the implications for the Council; and

 

4. That further work be undertaken to explore the possible opportunities for crowdfunding to support the allocation of CIL funding, as set out in paragraphs 6.1 to 6.3 of the report, with a further report to Cabinet on this matter later in 2022.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Infrastructure Delivery Officer introduced a report which detailed out proposals for the use of Community Infrastructure Levy (CIL) funding available to support the delivery of non-strategic infrastructure within the unparished areas of the Borough required to support growth arising from new development. Since the introduction of CIL funding a proportion of CIL receipts (the Neighbourhood Portion) had been transferred to the parish/town Council’s to support the delivery of strategic infrastructure within their areas. The Council had also retained an equivalent portion of CIL funding for the unparished parts of the Borough in a separate funding pot which at the end of the 2021/22 amounted to £2.53M and was accumulating at an average of £316K per annum.

At its meeting on 9th December 2021 the Cabinet agreed that further work should be carried out to establish governance arrangements which could enable the release of retained CIL funding for projects in unparished parts of the borough. It was proposed that the key principles for the governance of the unparished CIL portion should reflect the governance arrangements adopted for the management and allocation of the CIL funding retained by the Council for strategic infrastructure improvements.  An allowance would be made for the scale of projects and local priorities but in essence the projects would need to address the impacts of development in the unparished areas, support the Local Plan policies on spatial strategy/sustainable development whilst also contributing towards the Council’s Corporate Plan objectives. It was appreciated that lack of experience and expertise in community and neighbourhood groups was likely to impact on the identification of suitable projects. For this reason it was proposed that an initial programme of projects to be delivered within the unparished areas of the Borough should be drawn up through discussions with Council service departments and key infrastructure service providers such as KCC Highways.  It was also proposed to consult local Members.  For the initial programme a cap £500,000 CIL funding would be employed and the projects would need to meet the eligibility criteria and demonstrate that that they could be delivered within the next 12-18 months.

The report also asked the Cabinet to determine whether it wished to support the concept of using crowdfunding to support community projects, possibly by introducing a pilot whereby the Council might use CIL match-funding for projects that reached a certain degree of donations or to set aside a fixed amount from the unparished CIL to support projects delivered by crowdfunding.

A Member said that whilst he appreciated the need for projects in unparished areas to be undertaken, he represented the parish of Bean, whose rural nature meant that it was unlikely to generate development which would attract CIL payments and wondered whether there were any other opportunities for the parish to benefit from CIL funding. The Infrastructure Delivery Officer said that this would be very difficult as the CIL Regulations were very specific that CIL should be used to mitigate the impact of development in the particular locality. However it  ...  view the full minutes text for item 9.

10.

Draft Private Sector Renewal Strategy 2022-2025 pdf icon PDF 124 KB

Summary:

 

The draft Private Sector Housing Renewal Strategy 2022-2025 sets out how the Council aims to address the need for housing renewal in the Dartford Borough. The Strategy sets out the current position regarding the condition of the private sector housing stock and the need for improvements. It also sets out the types of assistance that will be made available by the Council for housing renewal and how this will be targeted.

 

Recommendation:

 

That the draft Private Sector Housing Renewal Strategy 2022-2025, attached at Appendix A to the report, be approved.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Head of Housing presented a report which proposed the latest iteration of the draft Private Sector Housing Renewal Strategy for 2022-2025. This had been informed by a comprehensive study carried out by the Building Research Establishment (BRE) on the condition of housing stock in the Borough, with a particular emphasis on the private rented stock. The report highlighted the key findings of the study and the comparison with the condition of the Council’s own housing stock.

 

The key findings had been used to help to establish the following strategic priorities for private sector housing renewal in the Borough:

 

1.  To enable residents to live independently in safe and healthy homes. The key areas associated with this priority are:

 

·         Elimination of Category 1 HHSRS hazards and reduction of disrepair

·         Promotion of safe independent living for those residents who wish it

 

2.  To decrease the numbers of households who are in fuel poverty and/or suffering from ‘excess cold’ and improve the overall energy efficiency of the private sector stock in Dartford. The key areas associated with this priority are:

 

·      Elimination of Category 1 HHSRS Excess Cold Hazard

·      Wall and loft insulation measures

·      Efficient heating methods

·      Improved Energy Performance Certificate (EPC) and Standard Assessment Procedure (SAP) ratings

 

The Strategy detailed the Council’s approach to housing renewal, including how it will take geographic area based, sector based and client based approaches. It also explained the various forms of housing renewal assistance available, including statutory and discretionary financial assistance, as well as non-financial assistance. The associated Action Plan set out various actions and target dates for achieving each of the strategic priorities. It was proposed that performance will be monitored through a private sector housing strategy steering/implementation group to be established to oversee and monitor implementation of the Strategy.

 

The draft Strategy had been widely consulted with key partners and members of the public had had the opportunity to provide their views. The results of the consultation were reported at Appendix B to the report.

 

The Cabinet Advisory Panel endorsed the recommendations contained in the report.

 

 

11.

Draft Housing Recharge Policy pdf icon PDF 120 KB

Summary:

 

The draft Housing Recharge Policy 2022, attached at Appendix A to the report, sets out the items that existing and former tenants, leaseholders, and those who have received other financial assistance may be charged for.  The draft Policy also sets out the process of recharging in relation to repairs and maintenance that are the responsibility of the resident.

 

Recommendation:

 

That the draft Housing Recharge Policy, at Appendix A to the report, be approved.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Head of Housing presented a report which detailed the draft Housing Recharge Policy 2022. This set out the items that existing and former tenants, leaseholders, and those who have received other financial assistance might be charged for and the process of recharging in relation to repairs and maintenance that are the responsibility of the resident. The draft policy sought to be transparent and to proactively promote a responsible attitude from Tenants and Leaseholders towards their property, and the environment in which they live, by the provision of information and support and reactively by ensuring that costs, where justified, are pursued from those who are negligent or deliberately cause damage. The report gave examples of works and repairs that would be considered to be rechargeable.

 

The Cabinet Advisory Panel endorsed the recommendations contained in the report.

 

 

12.

Land East of Lowfield Street Development - Redevelopment by Bellway (Thames Gateway) Phases 2 & 3 - Boundary Matters pdf icon PDF 102 KB

 

Summary:

 

To consider matters associated with the clarification of the positioning of the legal boundary between Central Park and the adjoining development site owned by Bellway Homes Limited and to also seek authority to grant Bellway Homes Limited, temporary access to Central Park to erect scaffolding and carry out necessary site works close to the boundary.

 

Recommendations:

 

 

1. That, as advised by the Council’s surveyor, Cabinet notes:

 

(a) the position of the boundary line edged green (adjoining Central Park), marked A – C - D, on the plan at Appendix A to the report;

(b)  that agreement has been reached with Bellway Homes Limited on  the legal boundary line (edged green);

 

2. That Cabinet consents to the submission of an application to the HM Land Registry, to record the agreement reached with Bellway Homes Limited on the clarified legal boundary line;

 

3. That, following the submission of an application to HM Land Registry, the Director of Growth & Community, in consultation with the Head of Legal Services, be authorised to deal with any requisitions raised by HM Land Registry; and

 

4. That, for the reasons detailed in para. 3.12 of the report, the Director of Growth & Community, in consultation with the Head of Legal Services, be authorised to grant a temporary licence to Bellway Homes Limited, for access to Dartford Central Park enable the erection of scaffolding and working space for the duration of its development works.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

 

The Cabinet Advisory Panel endorsed the recommendations contained in the report.

 

 

13.

Proposal for the making of the Dartford Borough Council Public Spaces Protection Order 2022 - Nuisance Vehicles - Borough of Dartford following Public Consultation pdf icon PDF 127 KB

Summary:

 

This report follows the report to Cabinet on 24th February 2022 which sought authority to implement Part 4, Section 59 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 to make a Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO), to supress the growing incidents of traffic offences and associated anti-social behaviour occurring principally due to nuisance vehicles across the Borough, following a statutory public consultation process, which has now been undertaken.

 

Recommendations:

 

1. That, on being satisfied that the anti-social behaviour activities detailed in the Cabinet report at Appendix C are still having, or likely to have, a detrimental effect on the quality of life of those in the locality, are persistent or continuing in nature, remain unreasonable and that on the basis that the consultation process has confirmed local support for the making of the Order, The Dartford Borough Council Public Spaces Protection Order 2022 – Nuisance Vehicles, Dartford Borough, be made, prohibiting anti-social behaviour associated with the gathering displaying and racing of motor vehicles as well as driving on land other than a road on terms set out in Appendix A to the report, to apply to the whole of the Council’s administrative area, as identified on the Order Map, at Appendix B to the report;

2. That the Director of Housing and Public Protection, in consultation with the Head of Legal Services, be authorised to undertake the statutory notice process for the making of the Order in accordance with the Anti-social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 (Publication of Public Spaces Protection Orders) Regulations 2014;

3. That, having made the Public Spaces Protection Order 2022 – Dartford Borough – Nuisance Vehicles, it not be enforced until the expiry of the  statutory 6 week period allowing for the Order to be challenged at the High Court; and

4. That the fixed penalty notice fine be set at £100, with immediate effect.

 

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Enforcement & Regulatory Services Manager introduced Jade Ransley, who had recently become the Community Safety Manager following Tony Henley’s retirement. Members congratulated Jade on her promotion.

 

The Community Safety Manager introduced a report which detailed the outcome of the public consultation on the proposal to introduce a Public Spaces Protection Order (PSPO). This followed consideration of this matter by Cabinet on 24Th February 2022 when authority was given to progress the making of a PSPO under Part 4, Section 59 of the Anti-Social Behaviour, Crime and Policing Act 2014 to supress the growing incidents of traffic offences and associated anti-social behaviour occurring principally due to nuisance vehicles across the Borough. The statutory public consultation process had been undertaken in accordance with the Council’s Consultation and Engagement Strategy Toolkit. This included consultation with the Police and the Office of the Police and Crime Commissioner (OPCC), Kent Highways, and Parish Councils. Contact was also made with Bluewater, the management agents of Quadrant Court and Asda, all of whom have been significantly affected by the nuisance behaviour that the PSPO would seek to address. There were 108 responses from members of the local community, which were summarised in Appendix D to the report, of which 91% were in favour of making the PSPO, including the Police and the Police and Crime Commissioner, and 78% had supported the area to be covered by the order. It was therefore recommended that the PSPO should be made so that enforcement action could begin, including the issuing of £100 Fixed Penalty Notices.

 

A Member questioned how enforcement would be carried out without increasing staff, particularly as most of the offences were likely to occur out of working hours. The Enforcement & Regulatory Services Manager said that the Council had a strong working relationship with the police, who had been very keen on the making of the order and that the order would allow the police to have additional powers to deal with anti-social behaviour of this nature than they currently had. The Council’s current contractor for other enforcement activities, LA Support (Kingdom), had also been directed to enforce the PSPO should it be approved.

 

A Member queried why the level of the fixed penalty had been set at £100 as he considered that this was disproportionately low in comparison to the £75 FPN charge for littering. The Enforcement & Regulatory Services Manager explained that the level of the charge was statutory but that if a recipient refused to pay the FPN the courts could impose more substantial fines. In addition the Council had decided not to offer a discount for the early payment of a FPN.

 

A Member sought assurances that penalties would not be applied to car enthusiasts and the like gathering and behaving responsibly. The Enforcement & Regulatory Services Manager stated that enforcement officers and the police would use their experience, discretion and common sense in the application of the order. In any event a penalty could only be issued where an offence was taking place and  ...  view the full minutes text for item 13.

14.

Air Quality Action Plan - Consultation Draft pdf icon PDF 128 KB

Summary:

 

To report recent air quality findings within the Borough and to approve the Air Quality Action Plan- Consultation Draft, to be taken forward for consultation.

 

Recommendations:

 

1. That the air quality findings, both historic and recent monitoring data available for NO2 and PM10, as detailed in Appendix B to the report and associated work, as detailed in the body of the report, be noted;

 

2. That the contents of the Air Quality Action Plan – Consultation Draft, at Appendix A to the report, be approved and that the Plan be taken forward for consultation; and

 

3. That following the consultation exercise, the draft Air Quality Action Plan be presented to Cabinet, for adoption.

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Environmental Health Manager introduced a report which detailed recent air quality findings within the borough and sought approval for the Air Quality Action Plan – Consultation Draft to be taken forward to public consultation.

 

The report considered air quality monitoring across the borough and compliance with National Air Quality Objectives, which were most commonly associated with traffic emissions, which were the dominant source of air pollution across the borough. Whilst improvement in levels of air pollution had been seen across the borough in the last ten years, the administration had identified pollution levels and air quality as priorities for the Council and an essential component of its intention to create cleaner and greener places to live and work. When a local authority had declared an Air Quality Management Area, of which Dartford had three, it had a statutory duty to produce an Air Quality Action Plan (AQAP) detailing measures aimed to improve air quality. A new AQAP was now needed to set out new measures to seek further improvements and the Council had engaged a specialist contractor, Bureau Veritas, to assist with the development of a new AQAP. An officer working group, including Council and Kent County Council officers, was working with Bureau Veritas to develop a schedule of measures to reduce emissions and these had been taken forward in the Consultation Draft of the AQAP. 

 

The developed actions within the AQAP had been categorised under five broad topics:

·         Priority 1: Public Health and Wellbeing;

·         Priority 2: Transport;

·         Priority 3: Air Quality Partnerships;

·         Priority 4: Planning and Infrastructure;

·         Priority 5: Policy

 

The Council was required to consult on the AQAP with relevant stakeholders and the public, including a submission to DEFRA. Following this consultation exercise, any findings would be used to inform and finalise the AQAP which would be brought back to Cabinet for formal adoption.

 

A Member drew attention to an error contained in the first entry in table 5.1 of the AQAP, which would be amended, and asked whether the AQAP was fully aligned with KCC Highway’s operations and objectives. The Scientific Officer confirmed that KCC Highways had been involved in the preparation of the AQAP. The Member asked whether tree planting around major roads was included in the AQAP as a mitigation for air quality and was advised that it was not as green infrastructure was not always beneficial and could actually lower air quality.

 

A Member asked whether the Council should be doing more to monitor PM2.5 particles. The Scientific Officer explained that the monitoring station at Bean had been closed during 2020 but was due to be reinstalled on a site to the south of the A2 with a new particulate monitor capable of monitoring both PM10 and PM2.5 particles. This monitor would provide a good strategic picture of PM2.5 across the borough. A Member questioned whether the monitoring station should not be located to the north of the A2 where traffic was heaviest but it was explained that there were limited options for  ...  view the full minutes text for item 14.

15.

Minutes of the Policy Overview Committee held on 15 March 2022 pdf icon PDF 332 KB

Summary:

 

To consider the minutes of the meeting of the Policy Overview Committee held on 15 March 2022.

 

Recommendation:

 

That the minutes of the meeting of the Policy Overview Committee held on 15 March 2022 be noted.

Minutes:

The Cabinet Advisory Panel received the minutes of the meeting of the Policy Overview Committee held on 15 March 2022.

 

16.

Westgate and Former Co-Op Site development - Exempt Appendices A and B (Exempt Category SO 46(1)(b) Annex 1 Paragraph 3

Summary:

 

To consider exempt Appendices A and B to the main report.

 

Recommendation:

 

That the content of Exempt Appendices A and B to the main report be noted.  

Additional documents:

Minutes:

The Cabinet Advisory Panel endorsed the recommendations contained in the report.